Monthly Archives: May 2010

Google search doesn’t seem to like Google Sites

This is so weird…

For years I’ve written a daily devotional, working my way through the Bible.  I’ve actually completed the O.T. and have now gone back to the beginning, editing and updating and adding devotionals.

Anyway, for a long time I had a “regular” website on a server.  I post the individual devotionals to my http://nazareneblogs.org/pastorscott/ account, but as I complete devotionals on books of the Bible I publish them as a whole to my website.  I track traffic to both “versions” of the devotionals and the nazareneblogs one get’s more hits than do the “book version” one at www.pastorscott.com.

A few months ago I decided to just move my personal site (including the devotionals) to Google Sites.  The site is easy to set up and maintain and it looks good.

However, my traffic from Google searches dropped to almost zero!  At first I thought it had to do with DNS, etc. so I waited a few weeks to see if traffic would come back up.  It never did.

Finally, I went back to a regular website.  It took about 3 days for me to start seeing traffic again, but after less than a month I was again getting hits to the site like I did before.

It seems strange that Google takes web sites it is hosting less seriously than those it doesn’t host, but that seems to be the case.

An easy way to post sermon audio online

(Updated, October 8, 2010)

I’ve done this using other methods, but I think this is about as easy a way to put sermon audio online as I’ve found.

  1. Get a free DropBox account.  Install it on the computer you use for recording the sermon mp3’s.  If you use this link to sign up, you’ll score some additional storage for me.  Once you’ve installed that, then update to the latest forum build from this page – this build will let you do more cool stuff. This is no longer necessary as Dropbox has been updated.
  2. Now, after you record, save the sermon to your new My Dropbox/Public folder
  3. Now, on your computer, right click on the Drop Box folder named “Public” – pick Drop Box>Get Sharable Link.
  4. Put that link on your church website – linking to recent sermons.  People who click on that link will now see a directory of the sermons and be able to listen right there.

An easy way to post sermon audio online

(Updated, October 8, 2010)

I’ve done this using other methods, but I think this is about as easy a way to put sermon audio online as I’ve found.

  1. Get a free DropBox account.  Install it on the computer you use for recording the sermon mp3’s.  If you use this link to sign up, you’ll score some additional storage for me.  Once you’ve installed that, then update to the latest forum build from this page – this build will let you do more cool stuff. This is no longer necessary as Dropbox has been updated.
  2. Now, after you record, save the sermon to your new My Dropbox/Public folder
  3. Now, on your computer, right click on the Drop Box folder named “Public” – pick Drop Box>Get Sharable Link.
  4. Put that link on your church website – linking to recent sermons.  People who click on that link will now see a directory of the sermons and be able to listen right there.

I put the Drop Box Public page in an iframe, so you see it as part of the church website.  You can see it in operation on our church website.

At the Pearly Gates

On this day there happens to be a backlog at the Pearly Gates. Nothing major, but there’s a line of several hundred people waiting to be processed in.

Once in awhile, there’s a great cheer from those who are close to the front of the line. The folks in the back are not only anxious for their turn to be admitted into heaven, but they are also curious as to what the cheering is about.

The line moves forward and there’s more cheering. “What are they cheering about?” those farther back ask.

Now, they’ve moved forward and there’s a great cheer by those just in front of them. Someone asks the one in front of them, “Did you hear why they’re cheering?”

“Yes,” she says, “Saint Peter says that Sunday nights don’t count.”

“Yeaaaaaa!” the group cheers.