Fulltiming and the Coronavirus

2019 – Airport Park CoE, Waco, TX

The coronavirus outbreak is a fluid situation.  Today’s guidance from officials may be outdated by this evening.  To some extent we are all just waiting for the next domino to fall.  Fulltime RVers aren’t exempt from all the uncertainty.  The other day I saw a meme on Facebook picturing a class C parked alone on a peninsula overlooking a pretty lake.  The caption, meant to bring a smile, said that they were practicing social distancing.  Then, in less than a day I saw a news article that New Mexico was closing its campgrounds.  I couldn’t help but wonder if that RV was being evicted from that isolated spot.

I see that FMCA and Escapees have announced changes in their rally schedules.  No doubt that leaves some fulltimers looking for a place to land now that they won’t be attending their rally as planned.

In our case, we’re still at our winter campground.  In fact, we had already planned on a longer than usual stay while I serve as interim pastor at a local church during their pastoral search.  A few days ago I mentioned to the campground management that we just might be staying into the summer – not because of the church assignment but because our summer plans might be disrupted by the pandemic.

At this point I think fulltimers might be wise to find a campground they like that will allow longer stays.  Many of us are in the higher risk group and it makes sense to take advantage of our more unstructured lifestyle to land in an acceptable spot and wait for the storm to blow over. Of course, everyone has their own particular concerns: family needs, events, appointments and the like. If possible, though, I’d be looking into suitable long term parking.

And, while I’m writing, I’ll switch to my pastoral identity for a moment.  From a health point of view, we’re urged to wash our hands to protect against a virus infection.  From a spiritual point of view, I urge you to spend time with the Lord – maybe whispering a 20 second prayer each time you wash your hands – pray for our world and for ourselves and those we love.  Ask the Lord to protect you against the infection of fear and anxiety that is sweeping across the world. Also, you might include a prayer of thanksgiving for running water and soap. Oh yeah, also pray for our President and other national leaders; maybe health care providers and medical researchers too.

Come to think of it, you might need more than 20 seconds for those prayers.

2019 – End of the Year Expense Report

doing-the-budget
Here’s our 2019 end of year Expense sheet…

I’m listing the camping related expenses as line item monthly averages. Then, I total everything else up and give just a general dollar figure. If you are researching fulltime RVing you already know what you pay for food, health insurance, etc. (or even if you don’t, my figures for such things won’t have any real world connection to what you spend on them). Also, by combining the non-RVing expenses I feel I’m better able to maintain our privacy.

We didn’t do any volunteering this year, so our campsite expenses are what we actually spent (with memberships prorated and included).  One mitigating factor here is that we spent about four months paying a monthly rate.  The rest of the time we enjoyed our touring lifestyle, moving an average of every 9-10 days.

I want you to know that our 2019 RV Maintenance and upgrades expenses aren’t as accurately reported as has been done in the past.  In January we bought a 2005 Safari Cheetah motorhome.  We sold our 5th wheel and pickup, and then bought a small car to tow.  I’ve never included capital expenditures in these reports.  This year as we moved into the motorhome we had many “moving in expenses” that I lumped into the cost of the RV; they aren’t reflected in this report.  Beyond that, as we began traveling, we had a mixture of RV expenses…some were part of getting set up for travel. Others were related to problems that developed as part of living the RV lifestyle.  I’ve tried to separate out the “we’re just getting the new rig ready for travel” from the “stuff happens” kind of expenses.  I’m considering the “getting ready” costs as part of buying the rig.  The other costs are included, but the figures are more ball park numbers and not as exact as they have been in other years’ reports.

And, sorry to say the higher medical costs from the previous year continued into this year, driving up our “just living” numbers. Aside from that our expenses have been fairly level compared to other years.

As you consider this expense report please remember that we aren’t trying to get by as cheaply as possible.  We just try to live within our means.   With the motorhome purchase and setup this year, we stretched things to (and honestly beyond) the limit!  There’s a lot of minimalist information on the internet – if that is your goal, this information won’t help you very much.  In other words, this isn’t a competition to see who can spend the least.

2019 Monthly Expense Averages
Camping fees (Out of pocket + pro-rated annual memberships*) $408.36
Cell/Internet/TV $256.87
Diesel (pickup sold early in the year, the rest was fuel for only the motorhome) $175.58
Gas (note that we now tow a small, very fuel efficient car for a daily driver) $39.43
Misc $25.88
RV Maintenance and upgrades (see the explanation above)
$500.00
Vehicle Maintenance (Mostly on the pickup prior to it’s sale in the early spring)
$185.89
Registrations/Vehicle Insurance (prorated to monthly and adjusted to reflect vehicle purchases and sales) $217.50
Propane $3.17
Mail Service $15
TOTAL $1827.68
Non RV expense – food, medical, “just living”** TOTAL $2275.80
MONTHLY GRAND TOTAL AVERAGE
$4103.80

*Note 1: Like Thousand Trails, Good Sams, etc. – prorated to monthly cost -but NOT including original buy in costs, if any

**Note 2: These expenses include items like: Groceries & Dining Out, Clothing, Hair, Medical & Dental Expenses, Charity, Health Insurance, and Entertainment – but not Income Tax and a few other expenses – or capital expenses like buying a car and getting it set up to tow four down

PS: If you find this information helpful, please leave a short comment so I’ll know it is worth the effort needed to provide it. Thanks.

Reflecting on our 2019 Adventure

Click on the map for details

Our 2019 Adventure was our first year in our 2005 Safari Cheetah diesel pusher motorhome. Traveling in the motorhome as opposed to the 5th wheel presented a bit of a learning curve for us. We got the Cheetah in January and put a lot of effort getting comfortable on the “camper side” of the rig. However, when we started traveling in April (and in spite of our having taken a few shake down cruises in it) we began finding mechanical issues that needed attention. Not only that, but we had a few mishaps that added to the list of needed fixes. We worked our way through them as we traveled and finally felt we had resolved most of problems.

Over all we drove the motorhome just over 4200 miles, visiting 31 campgrounds in 17 states. Our longest move day was 305 miles but our average move was just 136 miles.

Our winter stay was a bit longer than usual. Our year started and ended at Green Caye RV Park in Dickinson, Texas – 150 days total for the year. This isn’t anything close to being our favorite park, but it is near friends and family (and doctors) so it is a reasonable winter landing spot for us.

Our Thousand Trails membership continues to be a good investment for us. This year we spent 154 nights at Thousand Trails campgrounds in six states.

Our favorite campgrounds, though, remain Corps of Engineers campgrounds. Our America the Beautiful pass makes these great campgrounds a real bargain for us.

One of the highlights of the year for us was having our family join us at Hershey, PA Thousand Trails. We had a great time visiting all the sights of the Hershey-Lancaster-Gettysburg area. It was especially fun sharing with them some of our favorite attractions in the area – places like Jiggers in Mt Gretna and the Bird In Hand Farmer’s Market.

The other highlight of our year was celebrating our 50th Wedding Anniversary at Niagara Falls.  We celebrated all week, exploring the area everywhere from the beautiful Gorge to taking a boat ride through locks on the Erie Canal.  We saved our day at the Falls for the actual date of our anniversary and then went out for an excellent meal after a busy day at the Falls.

In a couple of weeks I’ll finish the year with an expense report – admittedly, it has been a pretty expensive year. Still, as you can see, we got a lot of bang for our buck!

2019 – Gettysburg Farm Thousand Trails – Dover, PA (take 2)


We are just finishing up our second stay in as many months at Gettysburg Farm Thousand Trails near Dover, PA. Since I have done a couple of recent reviews of this nice campground there’s no need for me to do another at this time.

The main reason we returned here was that we needed a base of operations to attend a wedding 100 miles from here. I was graciously given permission to leave the camper unoccupied for a couple of days (something not normally allowed for traveling members of Thousand Trails).

This stay is, though, part of a bit of an experiment for us this summer. During our previous years a stay of longer than 11 days was unusual for us. We “land” for the winters and travel throughout the summer. This year we returned to south-central Pennsylvania, bouncing between the various Thousand Trails for just over six weeks. Considering that we enjoyed a couple of visits from family and then attended a wedding it worked out. However, one outcome of our experiment is that we think we’d rather, in general, keep to less-than-two-week stays. There’s no right or wrong in any of this. We’ve known some folks who move nightly or close to it. For me that would be like having a job. Touring fulltimers have to find the approach that suits them best. For us, 10-11 days gives us the right mix of sightseeing and “just-living” days.

Just thinking: Make every day count

As we’ve enjoyed the fulltime lifestyle we’ve met some interesting people. Many fulltimers tell me they have a blog, and if they do, I bookmark their site intending to keep up with them. To be honest, I tend to forget those bookmarked sites and seldom look at them.

Tonight, something brought those blogs to mind and I decided to check in on those folks we’ve meet along the way.

To my surprise many of them have left the road. As far as I can tell, the lifestyle changes were pretty much voluntary although I know of a few folks who have had health issues that forced a change of lifestyle (I wrote about that here). The others, I think, just came to a “been there done that” time in life and decided to find a place to land and start a new chapter in their lives.

While I was surprised at the number of fulltime RVers we’ve met that are no longer traveling it comes as no surprise that things change. In fact, as someone has wisely said, change is the one constant in life.

It is, though, good to be reminded that as enjoyable as fulltiming is, for most of us it’s an all too brief passage of life. Hopefully, for us, the adventure will end because we done all we wanted to do and are ready for a different sort of adventure. There’s a pretty good chance though, that it will involve something less voluntary.

I guess the point of this philosophic rambling is a reminder that the fulltime lifestyle, as enjoyable as it is, is a temporary passage in life. We don’t want to take this blessing for granted and we don’t want to get sidetracked from it by anything that doesn’t measure up, although it is reasonable to be reminded that some things do measure up and can make an unexpected appearance at any time (we’ve had that happen once). As it is, though, this chapter will end soon enough. Whether we have a short or long time to go in this adventure we want to make every day count.

2019 – Motorhome Owners!

After fulltiming in our beloved 2007 NuWa Hitchhiker II LS 5th wheel for nearly 6 years we have made a big change to a little driven 2005 Safari Cheetah diesel pusher coach.  The new (to us) rig has many bells and whistles.  I’ll have much more to write about this new chapter in our fulltiming adventure as time goes by.  For now we are very busy getting moved in.  Right off we have learned that a 39′ motorhome has considerably less storage than a 34′ 5th wheel!  Our family came through for us big time, helping us move out of our Hitchhiker and into the Cheetah – I don’t think we would have made it without their help.  Honestly, we aren’t nearly settled in yet.  We have time though, as we don’t intend on beginning our 2019 Adventure until mid-March.  No doubt about it, this is a big move for us that we hope gives us several more years of rv adventures.

Click this for full screen photos

 

2018 – End of Year Expense Report

doing-the-budget
Here’s our 2018 end of year Expense sheet…

I’m listing the camping related expenses as line item monthly averages. Then, I total everything else up and give just a general dollar figure. If you are researching fulltime RVing you already know what you pay for food, health insurance, etc. (or even if you don’t, my figures for such things won’t have any real world connection to what you spend on them). Also, by combining the non-RVing expenses I feel I’m better able to maintain our privacy.

During the year we spent three months volunteering and receiving a campsite at no charge. For the purpose of this report, I’ve estimated the value of these months at $325 each. Also, we own a small car that doesn’t travel with us.  We have it 4-6 months a year.  That lowers our diesel use and adds a gasoline line to our expense sheet.

During 2018, in addition to our months of volunteering, we spent a two months paying monthly rates. The rest of the time we were traveling, moving an average of just over one week.

2018 was a tough year for us financially.  We did one major repair on our 5th wheel (over $5000!) and a couple of costly pickup repairs that drove our costs quite high.

Also, we had some bigger medical costs this year, driving up our “just living” numbers.  Other expenses are drifting upwards, primarily, I think, due to inflation rather than any big changes in our lifestyle.

One takeaway here is that if you stay in the fulltime lifestyle long enough you are going to have some big, undesirable costs – the same as can happen if you live a more conventional lifestyle.  If you get in by stretching your finances to the limit, sooner or later, you will face a financial crisis.  This year our reserves were hit hard, but we are thankful we had those reserves to draw from.  Hopefully, 2019 will be kinder to us, allowing us to recover a bit.

2018  Monthly Expense Averages
Camping fees (Value of volunteering + out of pocket + pro-rated annual memberships*) $424.12
Cell/Internet/TV $253.84
Diesel (During the months in which we have a car the truck doesn’t get driven much) $285.88
Gas (note: we only had the car with us about 5 months but this is a 12 month ave.) $19.41
Misc $17.35
RV Maintenance and upgrades (OUCH!) $548.06
Vehicle Maintenance (More financial pain!) $443.22
Registrations/Vehicle Insurance (prorated to monthly) $198.07
Propane $11.62
Mail Service $15.75
TOTAL $2217.29
Non RV expense – food, medical, “just living”**                                    TOTAL $1817.21
MONTHLY GRAND TOTAL AVERAGE
$4034.50

*Note 1: Like Thousand Trails, Good Sams, etc. – prorated to monthly cost -but NOT including original buy in costs, if any

**Note 2: These expenses include items like: Groceries & Dining Out, Clothing, Hair, Medical & Dental Expenses, Charity, Health Insurance, and Entertainment – but not Income Tax and a few other expenses

PS: If you find this information helpful, please leave a short comment so I’ll know it is worth the effort needed to provide it. Thanks.

Reflecting on our 2018 Adventure

Schoodic Woods Campground – Acadia National Park, Maine

Our 2018 Adventure included lots of travel. We towed the 5th wheel over 5100 miles, visiting 34 campgrounds in 17 states. Our average travel day was 150 miles and our average stay was about 11 days (although that is skewed a bit because of two longer winter stops).

We had lots of opportunities to enjoy our upgraded Thousand Trails membership, spending 120 nights at their properties. Our membership saves us a lot of money and much of my travel planning consists of stitching together a route that includes these campgrounds.

We also stayed 45 nights in Corps of Engineers campgrounds. These are our favorite campgrounds: almost always well laid out, spacious, and in beautiful locations. With our America the Beautiful pass we average paying $11-12 per night. Really, the CoE campgrounds spoil us for staying in tighter, urban campgrounds. If there is any negative at all it is that these campgrounds often offer only water and electric hookups and are generally rather out of the way, off the beaten track.

Generally speaking, we like alternating our stays between campgrounds right in the middle of the action and quieter, more laid-back spots. That approach was really evident during our two weeks at Acadia National Park in Maine. The first week we were in a commercial campground located in the heart of the action on Mt. Desert Island. The second week we were at Schoodic Woods campground located in the “quiet side” of the National Park. That week was our favorite week of the entire summer. In fact, we enjoyed our month in Maine very much. It is a beautiful state with friendly people.

We also spent quite a bit of time in Pennsylvania.  We had been there before, but this stay was longer and we had time to get acquainted with more areas.  It is a great state to visit with lots to see and do.

One change for us is that after volunteering at Battleship Texas and San Jacinto Monument the past several years, including the opening months of 2018, we decided to take a break upon our return to the Houston area. Instead we settled into a residential RV Park in Dickinson, TX for a few months.

This year, in spite of the enjoyable travels, wasn’t trouble free. Right off I knew I needed to take the 5th wheel in to the factory for service. It was a major repair and rather expensive. Then, in Indiana I had the pickup in the shop. I knew the repair was coming, but there was another big hit to the bank account. A couple of months later the pickup was back in the shop not once, but twice, for both maintenance and work again. All in all, this was our most expensive vehicle/5th wheel year to date. These expenses will be obvious when I release our 2018 expense sheet in a few weeks.

We’ve been reminded in unwelcome ways that traveling in a RV doesn’t take us away from real life as we’ve had our share of doctor’s visits and expenses. Happily, the outcomes to this point have been reasonably good although the final chapter hasn’t been written on some issues. One silver lining to these clouds is that we’ve had a chance to affirm that traveling fulltimers can walk into most any Urgent Care and get help. Another is that all the money we spend on insurance actually gets us decent coverage. Still, I’d rather just buy the insurance without needing it!

We still enjoy the nomadic RVing life and hope to continue for the foreseeable future. With both 5th wheel and pick-up being in the shop this year we’re thinking about doing some trading, likely to a motorhome. However, at this point we’re just thinking about it. Stay tuned on that front.

2018 – Shortstop – Warrior RV Park – Tulsa, OK

We don’t do many one night stops. Our lifestyle as fulltimers is shorter moves and longer stays. When we were vacationers we did the opposite: longer moves and shorter stays. However, there are always exceptions so once in a while we do a “shortstop” of just a night or two. In this case we’re taking our Hitchhiker to its birthplace in Chanute, KS for some long overdue repairs and just needed a spot to land for the night.  One plus for us is that we have some long time friends in Tulsa and we enjoyed some time with them.

All of that to say we did a one night stop in Tulsa at Warrior RV park. Really, it’s a nice place for a short stay; located right on I44 and near Hwy 75. This is an older park, mostly pull-throughs. Our site was barely long enough for pickup and hooked up camper. All the connections are at the back of the site so I had to get out an extra water hose and add a sewer hose connection. The water connect is underground. I had to get down on my knees to connect the water hose.

The owners are friendly and accomodating. I asked about parking and they directed me to some nearby sites that they didn’t expect to use and told me that any of them are fine. They also offered to help me hook up the water if I was having trouble getting to the spigot. Yes, you can hear the traffic, but when you pick an RV park beside an interstate you can’t expect much else. The restrooms are older. When we were there they needed cleaning, but it looked like the need was the result of recent activity.  Our Verizon signal was good, campground WiFi worked fine, and I had no problem getting a satellite TV signal.

If you are visiting Tulsa and need a spot or traveling across Oklahoma and just want a stop for a night or two, this is a good place to land.


Click this for full screen photos
See individual photos with notes here.

Reflecting on our 2017 Adventure

Our 2017 Adventure had both ups and downs.  It was a year with several unexpected expenses that included a broken windshield and various camper repair projects.  Later on we decided it was time to put new tires on the camper.  At four and a half years they still looked good but camper tires are notorious for failing at about that age.  We also ended up putting new tires on the truck, but, sorry to say, that came after a major tire failure that did damage to the truck.  Not long after that the truck ended up in the shop for a bigger repair.  After working through the issue with the warranty company, the repair ended up costing us hundreds rather than thousands of dollars.  Still, it was an expense that hit the bank account pretty hard.  The lesson learned wasn’t a new one, but still hit us in the wallet: when it rains it pours.

2017 also brought some medical issues our way, some are still ongoing.  That reminds us of another old lesson made new: life happens, even when you are living the RV dream.

During the year we tried a bit different approach to travel.  Rather than moving every 1-2 weeks during the months when we aren’t volunteering we decided to slow down in the early spring while we waited for warmer temperatures up north.  We spent a month on the Alabama coast, then another month near Knoxville, TN.    The result was mixed.  The month in Alabama wasn’t bad at all.  We were in a park that had lots of winter people and lots of interesting activities.  The month in Tennessee, so close to the month in Alabama, seemed longer.  The campground was crowded and the weather was wet.  All this added up to a less than enjoyable stay for us.  Lesson learned: be careful when scheduling longer stays to be sure the campground/area is worth the lengthy stop and don’t schedule longer stops too close together.

While we were in Indianapolis we were joined by our son and family for a few nights.  The camper was really crowded.  Still, it was fun seeing our loved ones and accommodating our “guests.”  None of us would have enjoyed this set up for a longer stay, but for a few nights it was great and we would happily do it again.   The lesson learned is that changing things up for a special occasion can be fun even if it is inconvenient.

We enjoyed family a couple of other times during the Adventure, spending a week near Jackie’s brother and his wife, Jim and Phyllis. This was followed by a couple of stays near Jackie’s family in Iowa.  Then in the fall, my sister Susan joined us and traveled with us for a couple of weeks.  These family times are a real bonus and make traveling even more fun.  Same lesson: it’s a real bonus being with family and friends.

We always enjoy worshiping with the various congregations we visit in our travels.  This year we especially enjoyed the Church of the Nazarene in Summerdale, AL.  Being that this was one of our longer stays we got to know the folks a bit rather than just being one or two Sunday visitors.  Then, we finished the year by filling in for a month for a pastor friend of ours in Denison, TX and then accepting an interim assignment (still ongoing) at Baytown, TX.  A good lesson is that while being a perpetual church visitor is always interesting, nothing takes the place of being part of a worshiping community.

During 2017 we towed the camper nearly 5000 miles, visited 17 states, and stayed in 34 different places.  This year, when we arrived in South Dakota we completed visiting all 50 states (although not all in the RV).  We started and finished the year volunteering on Battleship Texas.  This marks our fourth season of wintering in this unique location on the Houston Ship Channel.   We are still working on our 2018 Adventure and expect to continue our journeys in this New Year.