Tag Archives: National Park

2017 – Scotts Bluff National Monument, NE

20170909_113407.jpg We enjoyed our visit to Scotts Bluff National Monument. At the visitor’s center we looked at the displays and watched an informative video. This distinctive formation was in Indian Territory and a landmark well known to many tribes. The pioneers followed the North Platte River as they journeyed westward. They could see these formations for days as they traveled across the prairie. This route is known as the Oregon Trail and was also part of the Mormon Trail. The Pony Express also rode through the area. As many travelers before us, we could see the Bluff as arrived in the area, and as travelers have for generations, we camped near the base of Scotts Bluff. Unlike those early travelers, though, we drove a twisting road through tunnels and with increasing vistas to the top. The view is amazing. We walked to various overlooks, thoroughly enjoying the scenery spread out below. I’m glad we were able to visit a place we have heard of most of our lives.

20170909_085331.jpg20170909_110838.jpg20170909_111058.jpg20170909_111238.jpg20170909_111309.jpg20170909_113352.jpg20170909_113407.jpg20170909_113419.jpg20170909_113623.jpg20170909_115039.jpg20170909_115722.jpgIMG_6305.JPGIMG_6306.JPGIMG_6307.JPGIMG_6313.JPGIMG_6314.JPGIMG_6317.JPGIMG_6320.JPGIMG_6321.JPGIMG_6324.JPGIMG_6326.JPGIMG_6329.JPGIMG_6333.JPG

2017 – Black Hills Monuments – Rushmore and Crazy Horse

20170904_181249.jpg Mount Rushmore is spectacular and I would come again to see this monument honoring our country. The size and detail are amazing in the daytime and beautiful at night. After dark we saw a short movie about the monument, heard stories from a park ranger, and watched the lowering of the American flag by ex-servicemen from the audience. This monument is cared for by the National park Service and includes a visitors’ center, gift shops, and museum where we watched a movie telling the story of how it all came about. The artist, Gutzon Borglum, was a first generation American of Danish decent. He began the project in 1925 and it was completed by his son Lincoln shortly after his father’s death in 1941.

20170906_195341.jpg We also enjoyed going to the Crazy Horse Memorial. This is a family owned monument and the ongoing work of Korczak Ziolkowski and his family. There are American Indian artifacts and items on display as well as a gift shop and a restaurant. Ziolkowski and his wife have passed on but his children continue the sculpting. We were lucky enough to be there for not only one of the nightly lazar light shows but also one the two nighttime dynamite blasts that are done each year. Although it was extremely crowed we found indoor seating that allowed a great view of the light show and blasting. We’ve never seen anything like the blasting, as over 100 charges were set off in rapid succession, each one with a “boom” and fiery flash of light.

Both of these monuments are worth a visit and both should be visited in the early evening so they can be seen in both daylight and under lighting.

20170904_181249.jpg20170904_203305.jpg20170904_204131.jpgIMG_6171.JPGIMG_6173.JPGIMG_6177.JPGIMG_6180.JPGIMG_6183.JPGIMG_6189.JPGIMG_6190.JPGIMG_6191.JPGIMG_6193.JPGIMG_6195.JPGIMG_6214.JPGIMG_6227.JPG20170906_182121.jpg20170906_182131.jpg20170906_182139.jpg20170906_182229.jpg20170906_195015.jpg20170906_195148.jpg20170906_195156.jpg20170906_195206.jpg20170906_195309.jpg20170906_195341.jpg20170906_205902.jpg20170906_205920.jpg

2017 – Black Hills, SD National Parks Caves

20170825_164656.jpg We’ve enjoyed tours of both National Park caves in the Black Hills. We took the Historic Lantern tour of Jewel Cave. The park ranger was in Historic costume with a fitted coat and riding pants. That was the standard uniform of the 1930’s. We met at the log cabin rebuilt to the specifications of the cabin lived in by the first Park Ranger and his wife. Half the people were given kerosene lanterns to carry just like they did in the early days. We were warned that the tour was considered strenuous, we would climb up and down about 600 steep wooden steps (some ladder-like) and be required to bend and stoop in some areas.

20170825_164804.jpg Our guide was very knowledgeable about the history of the cave as well as providing plenty of information about the crystals on the walls and the various bats that inhabit the cave. It was interesting to see how the early cave explorers saw the caves and fascinating to think they could see so little of the path ahead as they went through the cave. I was very tired when we finished but glad I took the tour.

20170828_115427.jpg Our second cave was Wind Cave and we took the Fairgrounds Cave Tour. We enjoyed this hour and half tour. The cave continually equalizes the atmospheric pressure of the cave and outside air causing it to “breathe” in or out. Our tour was part of the upper and middle levels of the the cave. It is considered the most strenuous walking tour of the park with 450 stair steps along the 2/3 mile hike, but there are rails to hold on to. One flight has 89 steps going up. Our tour guide was a young lady in her first year with the Parks service. She was very knowledgeable about the cave, its history, and the formations. The major attraction of this cave is the Boxwork formations found in the middle level of the cave. We also saw popcorn and frostwork formations. This is an excellent tour and I recommend it for anyone who doesn’t mind a strenuous hike.

20170825_173647.jpg20170825_155714.jpg20170825_164642.jpg20170825_164656.jpg20170825_165852.jpg20170825_165902.jpg20170825_171031.jpg20170825_164804.jpg20170828_105837.jpg20170828_114543.jpg20170828_115419.jpg20170828_115427.jpg20170828_121500.jpg20170828_123834.jpgIMG_6108.JPG