2017 – Black Hills Monuments – Rushmore and Crazy Horse


Mount Rushmore is spectacular and I would come again to see this monument honoring our country. The size and detail are amazing in the daytime and beautiful at night. After dark we saw a short movie about the monument, heard stories from a park ranger, and watched the lowering of the American flag by ex-servicemen from the audience. This monument is cared for by the National park Service and includes a visitors’ center, gift shops, and museum where we watched a movie telling the story of how it all came about. The artist, Gutzon Borglum, was a first generation American of Danish decent. He began the project in 1925 and it was completed by his son Lincoln shortly after his father’s death in 1941.

Black Hills, SD – Crazy Horse Memorial” type=”image” alt=”20170906_195341.jpg” ] We also enjoyed going to the Crazy Horse Memorial. This is a family owned monument and the ongoing work of Korczak Ziolkowski and his family. There are American Indian artifacts and items on display as well as a gift shop and a restaurant. Ziolkowski and his wife have passed on but his children continue the sculpting. We were lucky enough to be there for not only one of the nightly laser light shows but also one the two nighttime dynamite blasts that are done each year. Although it was extremely crowded we found indoor seating that allowed a great view of the light show and blasting. We’ve never seen anything like the blasting, as over 100 charges were set off in rapid succession, each one with a “boom” and fiery flash of light.

Both of these monuments are worth a visit and both should be visited in the early evening so they can be seen in both daylight and under lighting.

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2017 – Black Hills, SD Scenic Drives


There are some terrific drives in the Black Hills. We saw many on motorcycles which Scott thinks would be the perfect way to see the area. We, though, did it all in our Ford F350. We had some tight fits, but thousands of people enjoy these drives in all kinds of vehicles each year.

Iron Mountain Road runs between Mt. Rushmore National Memorial and Custer State Park. It’s a thoroughly enjoyable drive with winding roads with glimpses of Mount Rushmore which is framed by the tunnels. This drive has the famous pigtail bridges and wonderful Black Hills scenery. I really enjoyed stopping at a pull off and getting my first real glimpse of Mount Rushmore if only at a distance.

The state park’s Wildlife Loop road is another fun drive. It takes you through open grasslands and hills where much of the park wildlife live. There were cute prairie dogs popping in and out their holes as traffic continues by. We saw pronghorn antelope out in the field and a herd of burros (descended from the burros of years gone by which were used to transport visitors to the top of Black Elk Peak). When the rides were discontinued years ago the burros were released into park. The burros have become expert beggars. We watched as two of them went to a small car and stuck their heads in wanting food. The colts were cute but when people didn’t feed them they wandered down the road and back into the meadow area. Of course, the main wildlife attraction at Custer is the buffalo herds. We were amazed at the size of the animals. We saw several groups including some with calves coming down for water. A very pleasant drive.

Custer State Park has a long history and many buildings. We drove past the current State Game lodge, a beautiful building opened in 1922. We saw buildings that the CCC built in the 1930’s. My favorite stop was the home of Badger Clark, South Dakota’s first poet Laureate. He cut the trees, hauled the rocks and built the home himself and it is just as he left it in 1957 when he died. His poetry and books are the story of a man living an independent life. An interpreter is on site giving tours daily June through Labor Day.

Another fun drive was Needles Highway with its narrow tunnels. Most are single lane so must be approached with caution. We went through one called “keyhole” that was so narrow that Scott pulled the side mirrors in. We enjoyed seeing formations that look like needles made of granite. There are many picturesque vistas to be enjoyed.

These drives are so scenic that I know they can be driven again and again as they showcase the beauty of the Black Hills of South Dakota.

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2017 – Heartland RV Park, Hermosa, SD


Heartland RV Park is located in Hermosa, SD – a few miles south of Rapid City and about 15 minutes from one of the entrances to Custer State Park. This is a large, well-laid-out park. Sites and roads are good gravel and site spacing is close but not quite on top of one another. Most of the sites are just long enough for the camping unit but plenty of parking is across the road from the campsites. The campground has decent WiFi, cable TV, a pool, and laundry rooms. There’s a camp store and a new activity building is just being completed. Also it looks as if the campground itself is being expanded. The staff is constantly out and about, keeping things in good shape.

The location itself is interesting because it is at the edge of the Black Hills which are mostly hidden from view because of the terrain. The immediate vicinity of the campground is treeless, rolling hills but within a couple of minutes of the campground the beauty of the area is plainly visible just to the west and within minutes of leaving the campground and heading west you are driving through it all. Rapid City is an easy 20 miles away.

For us, the campground struck a balance between being close to the state park, but with full hookups and an easy drive versus being right in the middle of it all but either being in the state park with electric only or driving through twisting, sometimes steep grades to a commercial campground in the Black Hills. Also, this park has the distinction of accepting Passport America and Escapees half price rates with no stay limit or blackout dates. You definitely want one of these two memberships if you are going to stay here.

Aside from being just slightly outside the beauty of the Black Hills the only other negative is the constant noise from highway 79, the primary north/south route in the area. Our site was in the row farthest from the highway so the noise wasn’t quite as bad as it was in the rows along the highway. The traffic is 24/7 so it is something you have to make peace with during a stay at this campground.

We found this to be a good spot for us as a place to stay while exploring the beautiful Black Hills of South Dakota.

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2017 – Black Hills, SD National Parks Caves


We’ve enjoyed tours of both National Park caves in the Black Hills. We took the Historic Lantern tour of Jewel Cave. The park ranger was in Historic costume with a fitted coat and riding pants. That was the standard uniform of the 1930’s. We met at the log cabin rebuilt to the specifications of the cabin lived in by the first Park Ranger and his wife. Half the people were given kerosene lanterns to carry just like they did in the early days. We were warned that the tour was considered strenuous, we would climb up and down about 600 steep wooden steps (some ladder-like) and be required to bend and stoop in some areas.

Our guide was very knowledgeable about the history of the cave as well as providing plenty of information about the crystals on the walls and the various bats that inhabit the cave. It was interesting to see how the early cave explorers saw the caves and fascinating to think they could see so little of the path ahead as they went through the cave. I was very tired when we finished but glad I took the tour.

Our second cave was Wind Cave and we took the Fairgrounds Cave Tour. We enjoyed this hour and half tour. The cave continually equalizes the atmospheric pressure of the cave and outside air causing it to “breathe” in or out. Our tour was part of the upper and middle levels of the the cave. It is considered the most strenuous walking tour of the park with 450 stair steps along the 2/3 mile hike, but there are rails to hold on to. One flight has 89 steps going up. Our tour guide was a young lady in her first year with the Parks service. She was very knowledgeable about the cave, its history, and the formations. The major attraction of this cave is the Boxwork formations found in the middle level of the cave. We also saw popcorn and frostwork formations. This is an excellent tour and I recommend it for anyone who doesn’t mind a strenuous hike.

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2017 – Arrow Campground, Wall, SD

We were looking for a campground with full hookups near Badlands National Park and Wall Drug and Arrow Campground in Wall, SD was one of our two choices. This is an older campground that is showing its age. We ended up in an area with a crew of construction workers. The hard working people left early in the morning and returned in the evening. Some of the campsites are set up with sites “back to back” so our neighbor’s 20 year old travel trailer on the driver’s side was pretty close. I’m sure we could have stayed in a different site had I asked. (Note to self: speak up!) The bathhouse was clean, but worn. After we were starting to set up I realized that there had been a sewer backup on the site on the other side of our camper at some point that needed to be cleaned up. However, someone cleaned it up shortly after that. Wall Drug is close by and if you don’t mind walking across some railroad tracks, it is easy walking distance. Speaking of the railroad tracks, we heard, I think just one train a day and none at night. One of the entrances to Badlands National Park is just a few miles south of town. Campground WiFi wasn’t very good but my Verizon 4G was fine. I had no problem getting my Dish Network satellites. On a future trip I think I’d try the other park or maybe forgo staying at or around Wall and just drive out from the Rapid City area.

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2017 – Badlands National Park – Wall, SD and vicinity

The Badlands National Park is a very different experience. We have an America the Beautiful Pass for those of us over 62 so we avoided paying the $20 entry fee. We arrived midmorning and it was already getting warm. There is a wide variety of wildlife here. We saw some Bighorn sheep, several prairie dog towns, an antelope, and a few birds. Although the loop road was busy we had no difficulty finding parking at the overlooks. We stopped at the Ben Reifel Visitor Center, had our picnic lunch in a covered shelter, watched the movie, refilled our water bottle, made a few purchases, and headed on out.

On our way home from the Badlands National Park we stopped at the Minuteman Missile National historic Site. There is a variety of hands on displays showing the significance of these sites in the Cold War and the arms race. The memorabilia is a reminder of those who served and the effect of the Cold War on the civilian population. There are actually three sites in the area, but we only stopped at the visitor center.

As you can tell, we enjoyed our time in Wall and especially, Badlands National Park.

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2017 – Farm Island State Recreation Area, Pierre, SD

Our final day at Farm Island was “eclipse day.” We woke to a severe thunderstorm that was pretty scary – wind, hail, and a downpour. Really, we should have bugged out to one of the shower houses. However, the storm was on us before we knew it. After 10 or 15 minutes of (thankfully) small hail, things let up. We feared the heavy clouds would block our view of the eclipse which was at nearly 90% for the area. However, at just the right time the skies cleared and we had a good view of the impressive display of God’s handiwork.

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2017 – Sightseeing Pierre, South Dakota

With less than 14,000 residents, Pierre, South Dakota is the second smallest state capital. We stayed in Farm Island State Recreation Area on the edge of town. Although it was cool in the morning when I walked it warmed up in the afternoon so we went into town for an ice cream cone and a few groceries. We stopped by the state capitol and saw the beautiful grounds including a park area with the Veteran’s Memorial and fountain. At one time there was enough natural gas in the water that a flame was lit from it, causing fire to “float” above the water. However, the level of natural gas has dropped and, while there is still the odor of gas, it is no longer the famous “flaming fountain.” There are several walking paths and another flowing fountain as well. Afterward we went to a busy Zestos ice cream for a tasty cone. As we drove around town I saw beautiful old buildings, many biking-hiking trails, and lovely homes with playgrounds nearby. For shoppers there is a Walmart, Menards, and small shopping Mall. While Pierre isn’t a tourist destination, we did enjoy some relaxing downtime there.

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2017 – Codington County Memorial Park, Watertown, SD

On a related note, our arrival in South Dakota was a milestone for us. South Dakota completed our goal of visiting all 50 states! Not all of that was done in the RV but through the years, we’ve been privileged to at least set foot in all the states. Pretty cool, huh!

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2017 – Visiting the real “Little House on the Prairie” – DeSmit, SD

The first building we toured looks like a one room school but inside has a coved wagon you can get into plus many displays about the travels of the Ingalls family bringing them to this place. From there we saw a dugout similar to the one they lived in on the banks of Plum Creek in MN. Near it is an original claim shanty similar to one they lived in that was moved from Spirt Lake. After living on the land for five years Charles had to file a governmental document called “proving-up papers” which describe the improvements he had made to the land. Apparently, he more than met the required standards. We saw the barn, water pump, and a reconstruction of Ma’s Little House. At the barn there is a calf and kittens to pet. The pump works and, for Scott, using it was a return to his childhood. At the house the docent told us several stories that took place in their home, reminding us of stories from the books. The visiting children were invited to help wash and hang clothes, beat the rug, and shake cinders out of the cook stove. There is a lush vegetable garden, herb garden, and wildflower display. The original Flindt’s garage building has been moved to the site and is now used to demonstrate and allow hands on rope making, corn shelling, corncob doll making, and hay twisting; all things that were done by the Ingalls family. We enjoyed riding the coved wagon across the fields to see a country schoolhouse like the one Laura and her sisters attended. The “teacher” told about a typical school day. She had everyone participating in her presentation, including having the children read from early readers. She talked about the lunch pails and lunches the children might have brought. We found the Ingalls Homestead to be a very fun and active place and well worth the visit.

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